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東京大学公共政策大学院 | GraSPP / Graduate School of Public Policy | The university of Tokyo

For Prospective Students

For Prospective Students

Schedule of Studying Abroad

Timeline of Foreign Exchange Students

●Participating students will study at the University of Tokyo for one year, followed by one semester of study at Peking University and another at Seoul National University.

●After two years, participating students can obtain a Master’s degree from the University of Tokyo and a Joint Certificate of Attendance from the BESETO consortium.

Timeline of Double Degree Students

●Participating students will study at the University of Tokyo for one year, followed by study of one and a half years at Peking University and Seoul National University. Students who wish to obtain their second degree at PKU will study there for one year with an additional semester at SNU. Similarly, students who wish to obtain their second degree at SNU will study there for one year with an additional semester at PKU. The order of the One-Year study and Half-Year study periods may be reversed.

●In two and a half years, participating students can obtain a Master’s degree from the University of Tokyo and either a Master of International Studies from SNU or a Master of Law in International Studies from PKU (having studied at either university for a full year), and a Joint Certificate of Attendance from the BESETO consortium.

Students’ Schedule

  • Exchange
    Kenji Kurotobi

    Week schedule

    Comment

    Prior to my study abroad, I had two worries chiefly in mind. The first was communicating with Chinese people. However at Peking University, there are Chinese classmates happy to speak to me in Japanese and others who are interested in Japan, and nowadays I enjoy interacting with them in Chinese, English and Japanese. I also attend dinner parties hosted frequently by the student exchange group. There were times when rising anti-Japanese sentiments were reported by the media, but I did not encounter trouble with any Chinese I met on account of my nationality, even outside the university. My second worry was about how I could continue job-hunting while in Beijing, but happily this proved unfounded. I was indeed able to come back temporarily to Japan for this purpose by following the rules set by Peking University, with confirmation from professors, and after completing the relevant documentation. I should add that, although I did not attend, there are, in fact, career forums mainly for Japanese students held in Beijing.

  • Seoul National University DD
    Koshiro Nagai

    Week schedule

    Comment

    I’ve had stimulating discussions with professors and students from various backgrounds. It was interesting because I could hear a wide range of viewpoints on various issues. It became difficult to organize discussion when we approached the heated topic of whether democracy was suitable to Chinese governance or not. I did not have much anxiety about daily life in China; actually, most necessary items could be purchased close to the dormitory. I did worry a little about air pollution, but the situation has been slightly improving these days.

  • PKU DD
    Tasuya Ogawa

    Week schedule

    Comment

    One of the most intellectually stimulating parts is the discussion. Western students have been trained in debating techniques since they were very young so that most of their arguments are very consistent and structured. Additionally, everyone actively participates in discussion since class participation is evaluated based on contribution through the discussion. Concerning the life in China, I was anxious about the air pollution, but though Japanese media emphasizes that Beijing weather is very bad, the weather has not been so bad everyday here and for some other days, the sky is as blue and clean as that of Tokyo. Chinese students who are assigned to be our roommates generously take care of our life in PKU. As we get closer, they teach us their own hometown information and other interesting things associated with China. When I have time, I am trying to communicate with them, either by chatting or by hanging out together.

  • Peking University DD
    Eimi Yamamitsu

    Week schedule

    Comment

    In the lecture “Topics in Area Studies” given by a visiting professor from the University of Pennsylvania, we analyzed how economy, culture and society have been transformed as Asian countries have modernized. Taking diverse perspectives, from ethnology and history to politics, I was able to gain an understanding of the “corporate culture” which is uniquely prevalent in East Asia, and also discover how Japanese society is seen by Korean and Chinese students. On occasion, what was presented as “Japanese” or “Chinese” culture in lectures by Korean professors struck me as outdated or stereotypical, but this gave both the professor and students the opportunity to rectify these misunderstandings through active debate.

  • UTokyo DD
    Tianyuan HUANG

    Week schedule

    Comment

    If it were not for a very tight class schedule, I’d spend all day at the National Diet Building, which I had been doing after July 21st – as soon as I finished my Intensive Japanese course- and until August 7th, the day before my departure from Japan. During that period, my schedule was more like: Go to the National Diet Library(NDL) by train before 9:20 am; Start working on archives at NDL until 5pm when it closes. Then, I go back to dormitory and have a huge dinner since I skip lunch. I’d still watch drama and chat with friends and family online after dinner.