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東京大学公共政策大学院 | GraSPP / Graduate School of Public Policy | The university of Tokyo

S2「Life at an IFI: Understanding, Designing and Debating Macroeconomic Policy」(5130280) 2018年04月27日(金)

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You are invited to participate in a pre-registration information session on the following course with a skype connection to Mr. Jerald “Jerry” Schiff in Washington D.C., one of the instructors, to be held on Tuesday, May 8 from 9:00am to 10:00am in Lecture Hall B (IAR 0414B) on the 4th floor of International Academic Research Building.

 

Course No. 5130280: “Life at an IFI: Understanding, Designing and Debating Macroeconomic Policy”

Jerry Schiff, Part-time Lecturer & Toshiro Nishizawa, Project Professor
June 5-July 6, 2018, Tuesday/Thursday 10:25-12:10
Office hours: Tuesday/Thursday 13:30-15:30, or by appointment
About the main instructor: https://www.american.edu/sis/faculty/schiff.cfm
S2 Term / English / 2 credits

Objectives

This course will provide an overview of the work undertaken at an international financial institution such as the IMF.  Lectures will analyze macroeconomic linkages and develop a simple framework for macroeconomic analysis and policy-making. Students will use this framework to discuss specific country cases and prominent issues facing the global economy. In this context, the role of global financial institutions, in particular the IMF, will be considered. Students will make (20-30 minute) presentations on a country case, produce (3-5 page) policy memos on a macroeconomic issue of their choice, and engage in practice job interviews (20-30 minutes) for a position at the IMF. There will be ample opportunity for one-on-one consultation before the completion of each assignment.

Teaching Methods

The first eight classes will primarily be lectures, although ample opportunity will be provided for questions and discussion. Class 6, on policy writing, will include an in-class practice exercise, followed by feedback.

Classes 9 and 10 will consist of presentations by each student focusing on a macroeconomic policy issue of their choosing.

Class 11 will be open for students to consult with the professor on their policy notes and practice for the final interviews.

The last day (Classes 12 and 13) will be comprised of extended office hours and a series of one-on-one mock job interviews, about 15-20 minutes each.

Grading

Course grades will be based equally on the three assignments: (i) the student presentations; (ii) the policy memo; and (iii) the mock interview.